Double Bay Sydney

Double Bay

Double Bay has the most expensive real-estate in Australia and takes its name from the bay of Sydney Harbour. It refers to the two geographical formations between Point Piper and Darling Point, which are interrupted by a miniature point in between. The eastern part is also known as Blackburn Cove. Colloquially it is often referred to as “Double Pay”, a term coined in the 1980s, due to the high income of people living there, and the nature of the shopping area which features high-end fashion labels.

Double Bay developed soon after initial European Settlement in 1788. In the early years of the colony, Double Bay was used as shelter for fishermen who would regularly fish around the harbour. Farming mostly cattle and lettuce a farm had developed and by 1814 it had increased to envelop the valleys leading into the area currently known as Woollahra, Bondi Junction, Bellevue Hill, and Point Piper.

Charles Amos Messenger was the sculling champion of Victoria (ca. 1875), in 1881 Rowing Champion of New Zealand, and in 1887 contender for the sculling championship of the world. Charles Amos also established the first boatshed on Sydney Harbour at Balmain, from where it was later transferred (by flotation) to Double Bay NSW. The early life of Double Bay, revolved around the Messenger boatshed.

Charles Amos was the father of the renowned Dally Messenger, Rugby League and Rugby Union superstar, and his younger brother Wally Messenger, who also played Rugby League for Australia. From their boatshed the Messenger brothers would row people across Sydney Harbour, including William Bede Dalley, who inter alia was acting premier of NSW in 1885, and who owned a castle in Manly, the base remains of which are still visible.