Kenmore Hospital Goulburn

Kenmore Hospital Goulburn

 

The buildings a wonderful example of late 19th Century architecture and the grounds are stunning.

Goulburn including Kenmore Hospital Goulburn  is a regional city in the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia approximately 195 kilometres (121 mi) south-west of Sydney, Australia, and 90 kilometres (56 mi) north-east of Canberra. It was proclaimed to be Australia’s first inland city through letters patent by Queen Victoria in 1863. Goulburn had an estimated population of 22,906 as at June 2014. Goulburn is the seat of Goulburn Mulwaree Council.

Goulburn is a railhead on the Main Southern line, a service centre for the surrounding pastoral industry, and also stopover for those travelling on the Hume Highway. It has a central park and many historic buildings. It is also home to the monument the Big Merino, a sculpture that is the world’s largest concrete constructed sheep.

Goulburn was named by surveyor James Meehan after Henry Goulburn, Under-Secretary for War and the Colonies, and the name was ratified by Governor Lachlan Macquarie. The Aboriginal name for Goulburn is Burbong,a Murring/Wiradjuri word indicating a special Indigenous cultural area.

The colonial government made land grants to free settlers such as Hamilton Hume in the Goulburn area from the opening of the area to settlement in about 1820. Land was later sold to settlers within the Nineteen Counties, including Argyle County (the Goulburn area). The process displaced the local indigenous Gandangara population and the introduction of exotic livestock drove out a large part of the Aborigines’ food supply.George Johnson purchased the first land in the area between 1839 and 1842 and became a central figure in the town’s development. He established a branch store with a liquor licence in 1848. By 1841 Goulburn had a population of some 1,200.