London Terrace Gardens - 425 West 23 Street - New York

London Terrace Gardens 425 West 23 Street New York

London Terrace Gardens – 425 West 23 Street – New York is an apartment building complex located in New York City, in the Chelsea section of western Manhattan. It encompasses an entire city block bounded by Ninth and Tenth Avenues, as well as by West 23rd and 24th Streets. Construction began in late 1929, at a cost of more than $25,000,000 (equivalent to $344,525,000 in 2015) on what was then to be the largest apartment building in the world.

London Terrace Gardens – 425 West 23 Street – New York building contains approximately 1,700 apartments in 14 contiguous buildings between 17 and 19 stories high as well as an Olympic sized swimming pool. London Terrace was constructed by Henry Mandel Companies  and the architectural firm, Farrar & Watmough.[2] The building is currently operated by two separate entities. London Terrace Towers is currently a co-op and managed by Douglas Elliman Property Management,while London Terrace Gardens is now a rental building and managed by Rose Associates.

London Terrace Gardens – 425 West 23 Street – New York encompasses an entire city block bounded by Ninth and Tenth Avenues, as well as by West 23rd and 24th Streets. Construction began in late 1929, at a cost of more than $25,000,000 (equivalent to $344,525,000 in 2015) on what was then to be the largest apartment building in the world.

London Terrace Gardens  425 West 23 Street  New York contains approximately 1,700 apartments in 14 contiguous buildings between 17 and 19 stories high as well as an Olympic sized swimming pool. London Terrace was constructed by Henry Mandel Companies  and the architectural firm, Farrar & Watmough. The building is currently operated by two separate entities. London Terrace Towers is currently a co-op and managed by Douglas Elliman Property Management, while London Terrace Gardens is now a rental building and managed by Rose Associates.

The name of the building stems from the former development also known as London Terrace, which consisted of roughly 80 houses built in 1845 that resembled London flats. The location was selected by Mandel due to the short walk to midtown Manhattan offices, as a way to provide modern low-priced housing for “white collar” workers. Victor C. Farrar, architect of London Terrace, compared the project to Rockefeller Center, and stated that large scale projects conserve valuable space and rehabilitate the city with modern apartment buildings and stores