Verbrugghen Hall Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Verbrugghen Hall Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Verbrugghen Hall Sydney Conservatorium of Music is one of the best recital halls in Sydney and hosts many wonderful concerts and performances.

The Conservatorium was home to Australia’s first full-time orchestra, composed of both professional musicians and Conservatorium students. The orchestra remained Sydney’s main orchestra for much of the 1920s, accompanying many artists brought to Australia by producer J. C. Williamson, including the legendary violinist Jascha Heifetz, who donated money to the Conservatorium library for orchestral parts. However, during the later part of the stewardship of Verbrugghen’s successor, Dr W. Arundel Orchard (Director 1923–34), there were tensions with another emerging professional body, the “ABC Symphony Orchestra”, later to become the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, driven by the young, ambitious and energetic Bernard Heinze, Director-General of Music for the Federal Government’s new Australian Broadcasting Commission.

In 1935, under Edgar Bainton (Director 1934–48), the Conservatorium Opera School was founded, later performing works such as Verdi’s Falstaff and Otello, Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg and Die Walküre, andDebussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande, among others. Under Sir Eugene Goossens (Director 1948–55), opera at the Conservatorium made a major contribution to what researcher Roger Covell has described as ” the most seminal years in the history of locally produced opera…”. Although the most prominent musician to have held the post of Director, Goossens’ tenure was not without controversy. Apart from the international scandal surrounding his departure in 1956, Goossens was said during his directorship to have channelled the best players in the Conservatorium Orchestra into the Sydney Symphony Orchestra (of which he was concurrently Chief Conductor),[citation needed] leaving only a student group for the Conservatorium. He disbanded the choir and several chamber ensembles and, some claimed, tended to ignore administrative matters.[citation needed] Richard Bonynge, however, who graduated in 1950, felt that it was Goossens who turned the Conservatorium into a world-class institution, lifting standards and exposing students to sophisticated 20th-century scores (particularly those of Debussy and Ravel).